Replica Slippers

Finally, this morning, I finished the sequining of the toes. Now, of course, this region of the shoes is far from finished. Once the body of the shoe has been sequined, I will still have to run a finishing strand of sequins around the opening, and, of course, affix the bows to the vamp. (I don’t know why the shoes look pink in photos, they really are blood red in person. I just didn’t have a Technicolor camera, nor the massive keg lights required to get the color right.)

Replica Slippers

To sequin this area, I followed the sequining method I previously outlined, placing down a thin line of painter’s tape to guide each individual line of sequins. Doing so, I worked forward (toward the toe) from just in back of the shoe opening. As I mentioned before, I alternated between sides of the shoe, finally allowing the two sides to meet just in the middle of the vamp. Working down the front of the toe, I continued to alternate sides, creating a stair step pattern where the strands of sequins meet, the final sequin of each strand tucking under (to a greater or lesser extent) the last sequin of the strand coming from the other side. This method, while it may sound slightly confusing, is identical to that found on the original shoes, and becomes apparent when studying photos of the original shoes.

Smithsonian Slippers (Image: The Costumer's Guide to Movie Costumes)

From here, I will work toward the back of each shoe, alternating sides as I work, to allow both sides to reach the back of the shoe at the same time, in the same way I alternated at the toe, which will allow me to replicate the pattern found at the front of the toe on the back of the shoes on the upper just above the heel, just as found on the original slippers.

Replica Slippers

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